Wulff…

Wulff 4

Lee Wulff is a legend in fly fishing and his flies really are icons. I have mentioned earlier that I love american classics. Lee Wulff tied the first ones all the way back in 1929, and this style of tying has inspired thousands of fly tiers around the globe. The style of tying are numerous,but they always have the wing in common. As always there will be discussions on how the Wulff really ought to look like,as with all variants of patterns. I have taken the liberty to change the material for the tail. I mainly use moose mane,rather than bucktail. The reason is purely aesthetic. I use and tie the many of the established variants in the series,and have added a few color variations for myself. These flies are excellent searching patterns,and they work especially well on fast flowing rivers. I find them both beautiful and efficient for a great deal of fishing situations.

Wulff Variant

Smith´s Emerger…

Smiths Emerger

I got this from a FB fly tying page. The pattern was tied by a skilled swedish tyer named Daniel Smith. My version is nowhere near as nice as his,but here it is anyway. His intention is for this pattern to imitate the emergers of the larger mayflies in Scandinavia. This fly will float in the surface because of the cdc wing casing. The spun thorax of rabbit or other fur will create enough life to mimic the hatch.

Pure Laziness…

The other night I was at a very interesting presentation on sea-trout fishing. The man responsible was sea-trout/sea fishing expert Asgeir Alvestad,a well known figure in the norwegian angling community. He shared his wast knowledge and experience on this subject. One of the things was the color chart pictured below. The color chart is based on many years of catch records,both his own and a lot of other anglers. This is off course no final thruth,but it gives the angler a good hint on which color to choose in different water temperatures. The chart shows that on low water temperatures white is the preffered color of the trout. During the winter the predominant food of the sea-trout is smaller fish. That means herring,sprat and goby. Asgeir also advices anglers to fish the flies real slow in the winter.
Fargeskjema 1
Check out Asgeirs blog: http://www.eu.purefishing.com/blogs/no/asgeir-alvestad/ (Norwegian)

The pattern below will be my choice for the rest of this winter,an all white baitfish imitation. I intend to tie it in many sizes and different hooks,sometimes I might throw in some kind of flash material as well. I will then carry Pantone markers in red,blue,yellow,green,brown and black,then just color the fly when needed. I use a short shank hook and eyes of different sizes and colors. Large saltwater flies tends to be tied on short shank hooks,especially the ones with eyes. When there are eyes on a bait, the fish goes for the eyes in about 70% of the hits. So,out of pure laziness this will be the one fly until the sandworms appear. Maybe I´ll call it The Pantone General…

The GeneralThe Pantone General

Pantone
My secret weapon…

The Original Skin…

Shedding May
When mayflies,and other aquatic insects, hatch they shed their nymph/pupa skin in the process.They also have small airbubbles surrounding them when trying to break the surface film. This can often be a very important trigger to the fish. I think the key is to just give the fish a small hint of this element. The whole point is not to make it to firm and compact. I see a lot of flies tied to please the human eye,and not the eyes of the fish. The old skin is translucent and often it still carries small silvery air bubbles in or around it. Personally I think the best method is the one deviced by G. LaFontaine on his Halo Mayfly Emerger. To create this illusion he simply winds a few strands of antron down the hook shank. Be sure to wind them loosly,and never use to much. This has worked well for me in various hatching situations. The second method that I use is just a small amount of cdc hanging behind the actual pattern.

Shedding Antron
LaFontaine´s method using antron yarn.

Shedding cdc
Alternative method using a few fibres of cdc.

Stimulator Variant…

Stimulator Finish

The Stimulator is one of the best known attractor patterns there is. The fly is tied in a great number of variants and colors. It can be fished as a stonefly or a caddis pattern,as well as a general searching fly.  I use it mainly when the weather is rough or the river runs high. Tie it in any color to suit your needs.

The grey/white variant pictured below is my choice in the autumn,when big moths constantly crashes into the water in the evening. It works exceptionally well in my local river at that time of the year. It is supposed to be scruffy and roughly tied.

Moth Stimulator

Dinodry – Dinocras Cephalotes

Stone 5

I very rarely fish stonefly patterns. But sometimes they can appear in large numbers. If you experience this,you will most likely have a great time fishing. They take to the water to drink. The Dinocras Cephalotes is the largest stonefly here in Scandinavia.

This pattern originates from Staffan Lindstrøm,and it is essential when fishing the great river Rena here in Norway. These are quite large insects and the fish will not let this meal pass. I use Staffans 123 yarn for the body,a mix of organza and antron yarn for the wings. Then use a paper clip and mix a few colors of cdc to create  the head and legs on the imitation.

 

Dyret – a silhouette caddis…

Dyret

This is a norwegian caddis pattern called “Dyret”. It is credited to a norwegian fly tyer named Gunnar Bingen. The fly is designed to attract the fish, not the human eye. From our point of view this does not look much like a caddis fly, but if we could see it like the fish it definately has the key elements and triggers.  Everyone can see that it has similarities to other caddis patterns like the Devil Bug. It floats well and is a great pattern for rivers in Norway. It should be tied in a variety of colors to match the naturals.

Hook: TMC 100

Tail/wing: Roe Deer/deer

Hackle: Rooster

Body: Kapok dubbing

Front: Roe Deer