Wiltshire Emerger 2…

These eyes followed my every move when tying this evening, and made tying difficult. My cat could´nt stand still for the photo!

I thought orange would make a nice variant of the Wiltshire pattern. Maybe it will work as a trigger to the trout,and it will also be highly visible. It will most certainly work as general attractor fly, and it should fool graylings easily. I really believe in this pattern. Remember that Fontaine choose orange for the spike on both his emergers. Tied on TMC 212Y sz.13.

Wiltshire Emerger…

Yet another great emerger pattern, not revolutionary but tied in a cool way. Check out Dave Wiltshire´s excellent blog to see photos. Here is my take of the pattern. I especially like the flash material tied down the hook bend. This mimics the nymph shedding skin.Tied this way it is almost like the tag/tip on classic wetflies. I will also tie this using snowshoe, and if possible compare the two options this season. Will tie,will try!

Biot Emergers…

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Black Biot Emerger

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Yellow Biot Emerger

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Olive Biot Emerger

I like using goose biots on cdc-emergers. This style of flies are usually my first choice when fishing mayfly hatches. I tend to use snowshoe-rabbit more than cdc for emergers, but on these it still is the best choice. The reason for using snowshoe is it produces more durable flies and that it is easier to clean after a catch. I tie a lot of different mayfly pattern these days. Customers just does’nt seem to understand what I mean when I say “please,order in good time for next season”.

Emergent Sparkle Pupa…

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It’s kind of strange to think about,but this fly has been a staple in my box for over 20 years now. It is a fantastic pattern. The reason for it’s incredible ability to fool trout is the special “touch-dub” method. Use a very sticky dubbing wax and make a blend of antron and fur/synthetics.When using this dubbing technique combined with real antron yarn the fly traps hundreds of shiny air bubbles. This feature is what attracts the fish and makes it go for the fly. During caddis hatches this fly can really work wonders. It must be Gary La Fontaine’s most succesfull pattern.
This is the color combination that works best for me, but I also use brown,rusty and yellowish colors. If this is not in your box already,then make sure it’s there before the season begins…Remember,it´s very important to tie it sparse and airy!

DHE…

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DHE Original

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DHE Uncut

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For all the CdC freaks out there…

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On the version above I added a trailing chuck of clear antron.
Hans Weilenmann is well known in the fly tying community. He is an excellent tyer and his tutorials are of a very high quality. The DHE or Deer Hair Emerger,is new to me. Inspiration is everything when it comes to tying. Weilenmann was brought to my attention by Kostis(wildtrouthunting). The pattern was originally created by Bob Wyatt,but I have taken the liberty to add a few traits to the original design. The original design is itself inspired by many great patterns. These flies will be tested this season…Check out Hans Weilenmann and Bob Wyatt on  YT for tutorials.

Halo Mayfly Emerger…

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I had the book signed by Gary when I met him in Norway back in 1991.

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The Halo Mayfly Emerger is an odd looking creature, but it works! Again it´s the “halo” that is the most eyecatching feature of the fly. Probably the most important feature is the butt made from clear antron fibers. The halo must be made from clear polyurethane foam, not closed cell foam. The clear foam gives of an aura of light above the thorax. La Fontaine says that this state lasts only 10-20 seconds in the life cycle of the mayfly. The spike/wing stub is made from fluorescent orange deer hair and may also be a good trigger. Some of his tests showed that the fish almost never rejected this fly when presented right.  I have had success mostly on rivers and streams with this pattern. I have yet to test it seriously on norwegian lakes. This pattern can of course be tied in any color to match the natural.

The Halo Midge Emerger…

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The Halo Midge Emerger (Original)

Gary La Fontaine was a great fly fisherman. I have read most of his books over and over again. Some of his theories may come across as a bit weird and sometimes to detailed. With the exception of the emergent sparkle pupa and a couple of others I have never really fished his flies a lot. On the other hand, his theories and ideas are with me when tying or fishing. His fly designs are not beautiful flies, they often look strange and awkward. They are effective fishing flies. They are based on what fish see from under the water and what makes it go for the fly. Some of the chapters in his brilliant book “The Dry Fly” certainly give food for thought on a lot of subjects concerning the way we think of imitations.

One of the imitations that interested me from the start were The Halo Midge Emerger. It doesn’t quite look like a midge pupa, but Fontaine states that it is enough for the pattern to simply rest partly in and partly under the water.  Further he says: “The shape of an emerging midge pupa is critical to proper imitation, but it is not the triggering characteristic. The most important aspect of the natural is the quicksilver brightness of the air within the transparent outer sheath. If an air bubble is visible in the emerging insect, it overwhelms every other feature”