Ephemera Emerging…

Vulg 1

This is a very good fly to have in your box…

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On those warm and nice summer days when this suddenly happens…

Mottlebou

And,this is the material you need. Mottlebou is simply mottled marabou. It has a great color scheme for imitations of the ephemera during the hatch. Combine it with hares ear for the thorax and a wingcase from cdc,and you will get one the most efficient imitations for this stage of the cyclus…you should definately try some of these this summer.

Vulg 2

Smith´s Emerger…

Smiths Emerger

I got this from a FB fly tying page. The pattern was tied by a skilled swedish tyer named Daniel Smith. My version is nowhere near as nice as his,but here it is anyway. His intention is for this pattern to imitate the emergers of the larger mayflies in Scandinavia. This fly will float in the surface because of the cdc wing casing. The spun thorax of rabbit or other fur will create enough life to mimic the hatch.

The Original Skin…

Shedding May
When mayflies,and other aquatic insects, hatch they shed their nymph/pupa skin in the process.They also have small airbubbles surrounding them when trying to break the surface film. This can often be a very important trigger to the fish. I think the key is to just give the fish a small hint of this element. The whole point is not to make it to firm and compact. I see a lot of flies tied to please the human eye,and not the eyes of the fish. The old skin is translucent and often it still carries small silvery air bubbles in or around it. Personally I think the best method is the one deviced by G. LaFontaine on his Halo Mayfly Emerger. To create this illusion he simply winds a few strands of antron down the hook shank. Be sure to wind them loosly,and never use to much. This has worked well for me in various hatching situations. The second method that I use is just a small amount of cdc hanging behind the actual pattern.

Shedding Antron
LaFontaine´s method using antron yarn.

Shedding cdc
Alternative method using a few fibres of cdc.

Why tie flies?

“Rivers and the inhabitants of the watery elements are made for wise men to contemplate and for fools to pass by without consideration” (Izaac Walton)

I found this nice pattern on smallflyfunk blog. It´s a size 26…it looks cool!

Sometimes I start to think about this subject. The obvious reasons are that the quality is much better than “industrial” flies,besides you get the exact patterns you want. I have created flies since I was about ten years old. I tied my first Rakkelhane at a friends house and understood right away that something had happened. It was a mental thing, and it made me rush to the local fly shop the day after where I bought a starter set from Turall. That was the beginning of a lifelong love affair with hooks,feathers,furs and synthetics. But what makes a grown man sit hour after hour creating small things of both natural and synthetic material. For me the goal is not necessarily to catch fish. A quote from J.Gartside says it all: “Even if there were no fish in the world,I would still tie flies”.

Ever since the early days I´ve tied flies for sale. My own boxes are always in need. Most of my time at the bench is spent tying for others. My flies are well traveled, much more so than their maker. I sometimes envy them. They go off to foreign streams,rivers and lakes and discover the world while I sit at my bench dreaming.

It becomes an obsession, one never gets to be an expert in this game, there are always new things to learn and new secrets to reveal. Fly tying is knowledge about animals,birds,entomology,fish and nature as a whole. Fly tying is in its own right a state of mind.

This is what I´ve really been doing the last few days…these midges are going to Iceland and will soon sit in the jaws of Icelandic browns. I am sending about 122 midges to Iceland,as if they really need more over there.

Mixed Up…

Being an old dj I like to mix things up sometimes. And yes,I´ve got a hang up on emergers and it is again caused by inspiration. The first is Dave Wiltshire´s Cdc Emerger and the second one being The Sparkle Dun Variant. Now,blend in some Gary La Fontaine and you´ve got these two all mixed up patterns. My guess is that these will fish quite well. Hook is the brilliant TMC 212Y.

Wiltshire Emerger 2…

These eyes followed my every move when tying this evening, and made tying difficult. My cat could´nt stand still for the photo!

I thought orange would make a nice variant of the Wiltshire pattern. Maybe it will work as a trigger to the trout,and it will also be highly visible. It will most certainly work as general attractor fly, and it should fool graylings easily. I really believe in this pattern. Remember that Fontaine choose orange for the spike on both his emergers. Tied on TMC 212Y sz.13.

Wiltshire Emerger…

Yet another great emerger pattern, not revolutionary but tied in a cool way. Check out Dave Wiltshire´s excellent blog to see photos. Here is my take of the pattern. I especially like the flash material tied down the hook bend. This mimics the nymph shedding skin.Tied this way it is almost like the tag/tip on classic wetflies. I will also tie this using snowshoe, and if possible compare the two options this season. Will tie,will try!

Biot Emergers…

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Black Biot Emerger

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Yellow Biot Emerger

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Olive Biot Emerger

I like using goose biots on cdc-emergers. This style of flies are usually my first choice when fishing mayfly hatches. I tend to use snowshoe-rabbit more than cdc for emergers, but on these it still is the best choice. The reason for using snowshoe is it produces more durable flies and that it is easier to clean after a catch. I tie a lot of different mayfly pattern these days. Customers just does’nt seem to understand what I mean when I say “please,order in good time for next season”.